Merchandising

My first official post is about an introductory survey of my merchandising course. The professor asked us about “which designer’s work you admire and why”, “what is your personal aesthetic, and “what is your favorite work of art”. These questions may seem like a piece of cake to most students, but someone like me, who is totally ignorant of design or arts, struggled quite a bit to give the answers. I feel like I’m a kindergarten kid standing outside the entrance of fashion hesitating, as what the little Jerusha Abbott encountered in her first semester of college. But I won’t be defeated. Let’s see how my answers will evolve after my education 🙂

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Name 3 designers who’s work you admire and why (any discipline).

  1. Givenchy: simple, elegant and feminine
  2. Valentino: glamourous, classy and sexy gowns with vivid red color and strong visual impact
  3. Giorgio Armani: long-lasting professional style with details and high quality

Describe your personal aesthetic using 5 words. Define what each of those words means to you and why.

  1. Purity. I love chromatically pure and bright color (e.g. yellow, red), which brings me a strong sense of happiness.
  2. Elegance. A classic and graceful look always has a great appealing to me (probably because I lack it).
  3. Simplicity. This is close to Japanese aesthetic. Furniture like MUJI, clothes like Uniqlo are a few examples.
  4. Panache. I like the way someone behaves confidently or shows his or her personal style with braveness and dignity.
  5. Detail. Detail doesn’t necessarily mean ornamented. Detail is an attitude towards perfection in every aspect.

Name 3 of your favorite works of art (across any disciplines) and why.

  1. Dream of the Red Chamber by Cao Xueqin. A Chinese classic novel of the Qing Dynasty. The greatest in every sense.
  2. The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh. A painting with emotions and passion shows mystery and profoundness of life.
  3. Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Anderson. Both children and adults can read but interpret differently.

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